Historical regions

/Historical regions
Historical regions 2018-05-08T18:53:52+00:00

Historical regions ~ England’s geographical features naturally separate England into seven quite distinct regions

map of historical regions

3 of these regions can be named with reference to early mediaeval kingdoms of the Dark Ages ~

Kingdom of Mercia
Kingdom of East Anglia
Kingdom of Wessex

The remaining 4 regions can be named with reference to points of the compass ~

England’s North-west Region
England’s South-west Region
England’s North-east Region
England’s South-east Region

The geographical features that obviously form a natural border or barrier between the regions of England include the following:

  • The Pennines separate North-west England from North-east England
  • The River Don separates North-east England from Mercia
  • The Rivers Nene and Cam separate Mercia from East Anglia
  • The (East Anglian) River Stour separates East Anglia from the Essex section of South-east England
  • The River Lea separates Mercia from the Essex section of South-east England
  • The River Thames separates Mercia from the Surrey and Kent sections of South-east England
  • The River Thames separates Mercia from Wessex
  • The Cotswolds separate Mercia from South-west England
  • The River Axe valley separates South-west England from the Dorset section of Wessex
  • The western edge of Salisbury Plain separates South-west England from the Wiltshire section of Wessex
  • The western areas of the North and South Downs separate the Hampshire section of Wessex from South-east England

Wild England teasers!    

1. Which one of the following 3 early mediaeval kingdoms of the Dark Ages was considered to be the wealthiest ~ East Anglia, Mercia or Wessex?

2. Which early mediaeval kingdom of the Dark Ages was associated with Alfred the Great?

3. Name the 4 traditional counties that lie within England’s historical region of East Anglia? Answers below

Answers ~

1. Mercia was regarded as the wealthiest kingdom (ref. Staffordshire Hoard)

2. Wessex (ref. Statue of Alfred the Great in Winchester)

3. Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire, Norfolk and Suffolk