In this language-learning level 2 webpage we have written about 37 animals:
Adder, Badger, Blackbird, Butterfly (Cabbage White), Butterfly (Peacock), Buzzard, Crow (Carrion), Crayfish (White-clawed), dormouse (Hazel), Deer (Red), Deer (Roe), Earthworm (common), Fox (Red), Frog (Common), Golden Eagle, Hedgehog, Heron (Grey), Jackdaw, Jay, Kestrel, Lizard (sand), Mole, Nuthatch, Otter, Raven, Robin, Rook, Snake (Grass), Snake (Smooth), Squirrel (Red), Stoat, Thrush (Mistle), Thrush (Song), Vole (Water), Water Scorpion, Weasel, Wren.
.
.
.……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..
. . . . . . . . . . . .SCROLL DOWN FOR AN EASY VIEW OF ALL THE LANGUAGE-LEARNING LEVELS (LEVEL 2). . . . . . . . . . .

 

Adder

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Adders are quite shy snakes. They like to hide in holes so they can’t be seen. Adders are quite small. They are about sixty centimetres in length. The female Adder is a little bit longer than the male.

The Adder can easily be recognised by a zigzag pattern on its back. The zigzag pattern runs all along the middle of the body. The female Adder has a brown zigzag pattern. The male Adder has a black zigzag pattern.

The body of the Adder is quite thick and covered with lots of scales. The female Adder has a creamy brown coloured body. The male Adder has a creamy grey coloured body. Both the female and the male Adder are dark grey or black underneath.

The Adder has a broad head and a small neck. It often has a ‘V’ shaped marking on the back of its head. Sometimes the Adder can have an ‘X’ or an ‘H’ shaped mark.

The Adder has amber coloured eyes with black vertical pupils. It also has a long dark stripe on each side of the eye. The stripe runs right down to the neck.

Adders have needle-like fangs which are hollow inside. Poison runs through the hollow fangs. Adders use the poison to kill an animal.

Badger

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Badgers are quite secretive and shy animals. Very few people see Badgers because they like to look for food at night.

Badgers have black and white striped faces. They have small ears with white tips. They have very good hearing even though they have small ears. They can hear a mouse squeaking as far as fifty metres away.

Badgers also have very small black eyes and very poor eyesight. They have round black noses. Their noses are often very wet and very sensitive. Badgers have an excellent sense of smell. They can smell up to seven or eight hundred times better than humans. Badgers also have sensitive whiskers on either side of their faces. They use their whiskers to feel their way around in dark tunnels.

Badgers have black and white hair on their bodies. Sometimes the hair looks a grey colour from a distance. The hair can also look red or brown because it gets stained from the colour of the earth.

The legs of the Badger are short and stout. They are also very powerful. The Badger uses its strong front legs in rapid strokes to loosen the earth when it wants to tunnel. Then it uses the claws on its five toes as a rake. Sometimes a Badger looks like it is literally throwing stones out of a hole when it is digging.

Blackbird

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

The Blackbird can often be seen in gardens, parks and woods all year round. The Blackbird can be a very noisy bird. It can be heard singing very loud songs. Sometimes a Blackbird can be heard singing quietly to itself under bushes.

The male Blackbird has black feathers all over its body. It has a bright orange-yellow ring around its eye. It also has an orange-yellow beak.

The female Blackbird has dark brown feathers all over the body. The female doesn’t have an orange-yellow ring around the eye. The beak of the female Blackbird is a dark brown colour. The female has dark spots and streaks on her breast that are not easily seen.

Blackbirds are quite plump and stocky-looking birds. They are about twenty-five centimetres long and they weigh around one hundred and twenty grammes. Blackbirds have rather round heads and medium-sized tails.

A Blackbird always seems to be very alert and lively when it is on the ground. It runs and hops very quickly. When a Blackbird is thirsty, it sips a drop of water into its beak and then tilts its head back so the water goes down its throat.

Butterflies (Cabbage White)

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Cabbage White Butterflies can be seen flying around in gardens and areas where there are lots of weeds. They only fly during the day.

Cabbage White Butterflies are relatively small. When they open their wings, they have a wingspan of about four and a half centimetres. The wings are usually white. Sometimes they can be a pale yellow colour. The wings are very sensitive and can easily get damaged.

The Cabbage White Butterfly has four wings and they are almost see-through. The forewings are slightly bigger than the hindwings. The Cabbage White Butterfly holds its wings together in an upright position over its body when it rests.

The male Cabbage White Butterfly has one black spot on the upper side of each forewing and the female has two black spots. The underside of the wings is a yellow-green colour or a grey-green colour.

The Common White Butterfly has a long grey-white body and two long thin antennae on its head. Both antennae have a knob at the end.

Common White Butterflies have three pairs of legs and six feet. They taste their food by standing on it because they can taste with their feet.

Buzzard

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Buzzards can often be seen in the open countryside near to small areas of woodland. The Buzzard is a powerful-looking bird with a short hooked beak. The Buzzard uses its beak to tear the meat off its prey.

The Buzzard is a ‘bird of prey’ and a ‘raptor’. A bird of prey is a bird that hunts smaller birds as well as other animals. A raptor is a bird of prey that hunts for food by mainly using its talons. The word ‘raptor’ in Latin means ‘to seize and to carry away’.

The Buzzard is a stocky-looking bird. It can be recognised by a cream curved-shaped marking on its breast. It can also be recognised by its rounded head and short neck.

The body of the Buzzard is covered with medium-brown coloured feathers. Sometimes the feathers are a dark grey colour. The underpart of the body is usually a paler brown or a paler grey colour. The Buzzard is a medium-sized bird. It is about fifty-five centimetres in length and has a wingspan of about one hundred and twenty centimetres.

The Buzzard looks very majestic when it glides and soars high up in the sky. The Buzzard holds its wings in a shallow ‘V’ shape when it flies.

Carrion Crow

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Carrion Crows can be seen in the centre of cities. They can also be seen in gardens. A Carrion Crow looks very nervous when it is in a garden. It seems to be quite shy.

The Carrion Crow can easily be recognised because it has black glossy feathers all over its body. In strong light the feathers seem to have a slight purple or green sheen to them. The green sheen can be seen more on the wings and tail. The tail looks rectangular-shaped when the Carrion Crow is in flight.

The Carrion Crow also has neat feathers on the top part of its legs. These feathers are called ‘thigh feathers’. The thigh feathers make the Carrion Crow look like it is wearing short baggy trousers!

Carrion Crows are quite stout-looking birds. They are about forty-six centimetres long and weigh around five hundred grammes. They have brown coloured eyes. They also have black powerful beaks that are slightly curved at the top. They have neat feathers around the base of the beak.

The Carrion Crow has four toes on each foot. Three toes point forward and one toe points backwards. It walks with long strides and hops every now and again.

 

Crayfish (White-clawed)

 

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

The White-clawed Crayfish is not a fish like its name suggests. It is a bit like a lobster. The White-clawed Crayfish lives in freshwater rivers and streams. It likes to hide under stones and rocks under water.

The White-clawed Crayfish looks like it has two long arms sticking out at the front of its body. The arms have large pincers at the end. Pincers are claws which the White-clawed Crayfish uses to grab hold of its prey.

The White-clawed Crayfish also has two pairs of antennae sticking out of the front of its head. One pair of antennae is nearly as long as its arms and pincers. The other pair of antennae is quite short. The White-clawed Crayfish can find and taste food with its antennae.

The body of the White-clawed Crayfish is covered in a brown or olive-brown coloured shell. The length of the body is about ten centimetres. The White-clawed Crayfish has four pairs of walking legs attached to its body. The claws are also classed as legs because the White-clawed Crayfish uses its claws when it wants to walk. The underside of the claws is usually an off-white colour. This is why this crayfish is called the White-clawed Crayfish.

Deer Red

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

The Red Deer is quite a large-looking deer with a thick sturdy body. It has a reddish brown fur in summer and a dark brown or grey coloured fur in winter. Its underbelly is a cream colour.

The Red Deer has long slender legs and a short tail. The tail is about fifteen centimetres in length. The Red Deer has a cream coloured round patch on its rump. It shows the patch to warn other Red Deer that there is danger in the area.

The male Red Deer is bigger than the female Red Deer and it also has antlers. The antlers can be over one and half metres long. Some antlers can branch off into sixteen points! The male Red Deer also has a mane of thick shaggy long hair which hangs from the front of the neck down to the chest. The mane usually grows in autumn.

Red Deer have a long head and large pointed ears. The ears have soft grey-white fur inside them. The fur protects the ears from dust and dirt. The nose and eyes of the Red Deer are black. The eyes are positioned high up on the head. This helps the Red Deer to have better all-round visibility.

Deer Roe

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

The Roe Deer is quite a stocky-looking deer with relatively short legs. It has a reddish brown fur in summer and a grey or brown fur in winter. It has a big black nose and it looks like it has a long black moustache over its nose.

The male Roe Deer is bigger than the female and it has antlers. The antlers vary in shape and size. The young male Roe Deer has a pair of antlers that only have a single spike. These antlers are about ten centimetres long. Most of the older Roe Deer have antlers which have two points. The antlers of the older Roe Deer can be twenty to thirty centimetres long and they are curved at the top.

The Roe Deer has a long face with a wide dark stripe that runs from the forehead right down to the nose. The ears of Roe Deer are large and oval-shaped and they have soft grey-white fur inside them. The fur protects the ears against dust and dirt. Roe Deer have long eyelashes and large black eyes. The fur around the eyes is either a creamy brown colour or a grey-white colour.

The Roe Deer has a white chin and a white mark on its rump. The Roe Deer shows its white rump to warn other Roe Deer that there in danger in the area.

Earthworm common

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

The Common Earthworm lives underground and it can be found almost anywhere in England where there is soil. Some adult Common Earthworms can be nine centimetres long and some can be as long as thirty centimetres.

The Common Earthworm has a long, thin, tube-shaped body. The underside of the body is a little bit flattened. The body is a pinky brown colour and it looks like it has lots of rings around it. The Common Earthworm has a large smooth bump which is over half way down the body. This bump looks like a saddle. It also has five pairs of hearts at the front of its body.

The head of the Common Earthworm is pointed and narrower than the rest of the body. Its tail is also pointed, but not all the time. The Common Earthworm turns its tail into the shape of a spade when it is in danger. It then digs the spade-shaped tail into the soil so it can’t be easily pulled out.

The Common Earthworm has no legs. It also has no eyes or ears, but it has a mouth. At night the Common Earthworm uses its mouth to drag leaves underground. It waits until the leaves are rotten before it eats them. The Common Earthworm has no teeth.

Fox Red

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

The animal often called a fox in England is the Red Fox. It can be seen in the open countryside and even in towns and cities. The Red Fox is very shy and it often tries to avoid any contact with humans.

The Red Fox has a slender body and a very long bushy tail. The body and the tail are a reddish brown colour. There is a white coloured patch at the tip of the tail. The Red Fox also has a white coloured throat and chest.

The legs of the Red Fox are long and thin. The lower part of each leg is a black colour. The Red Fox has five toes on each of its front paws and four toes on each of its back paws. The back paws are slightly smaller and narrower than the front paws.

The Red Fox has a long, thin pointed face and a black nose. It has yellow-orange eyes with vertical black slits. The eyes look like those of a domestic cat. The Red Fox has large ears which are triangle-shaped. The backs of the ears are a black colour.

The Red Fox has a good sense of hearing. It can hear a little mouse squeaking as far as a hundred metres away!

 

Frog common

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Common Frogs can be seen near garden ponds. They quickly dive into ponds if they get disturbed. Common Frogs can sometimes be seen jumping through long grass. The Common Frog can be recognised by its large sticky-out eyes which are situated quite high up on each side of its face. The eyes are an orange-yellow colour with large black pupils. The Common Frog also seems to have a relatively pointed nose.

The Common Frog has quite a sturdy-looking body. The upper part of the body is normally an olive-yellow colour with lots of dark blotches and spots all over it. Sometimes the upper part of the body can be a grey-brown colour or an olive-green colour.

The Common Frog has a pale greyish white throat. The under part of the body is also a greyish white colour. Sometimes the female Common Frog has an orange coloured underside. The underside of the body has lots of little brown or orange speckles all over it. The average length of a Common Frog is about eight centimetres. The female is slightly bigger than the male. Both the male and the female Common Frog have a dark brown patch behind each eye.

The Common Frog has two legs at the back and two legs at the front. The front legs are shorter than the back legs. The back legs are very strong and masculine. The Common Frog uses the back legs to jump. A Common Frog can jump up to fifty centimetres.

Golden eagle

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

The last pair of Golden Eagles to be seen in England was in the Lake District. Since 2004 the female Golden Eagle has not been seen and it is believed that she may have died. She would have been twenty eight years old in 2004. Now there is only one solitary male Golden Eagle in England.

The Golden Eagle is a ‘bird of prey’ and a ‘raptor’. A bird of prey is a bird that hunts smaller birds as well as other animals. A raptor is a bird of prey that hunts for food by mainly using its talons. The word ‘raptor’ in Latin means ‘to seize and to carry away’.

The Golden Eagle has its name because it has light golden-brown coloured feathers on the top of its head, on the nape of its neck and also on its shoulders. The Golden Eagle has a powerful, hooked beak which it uses to tear the flesh away from its prey!

A Golden Eagle is a large bird and it looks even bigger when it opens its wings. It has a wingspan of more than two metres! The wings look very long and powerful when the Golden Eagle flies. The Golden Eagle also has a long prominent tail that looks like a big fan!

Hazel Dormouse

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

The Hazel Dormouse is commonly known as the Dormouse or Common Dormouse in England. It spends most of its time in trees sleeping and looking for food.

The Hazel Dormouse has a round plump-looking body and a cute little face. It is about six to nine centimetres in size. The tail is almost the same length as the body of the Hazel Dormouse. The tail is around six to seven centimetres long. The tail is thick and bushy and covered with long hairs. The Hazel Dormouse weighs about twenty grammes in summer. That is the weight of about two one pound coins!

The Hazel Dormouse has a golden brown coloured body on the top. The underside of the body is a paler brown colour. The throat of the Hazel Dormouse is almost white.

The Hazel Dormouse has front legs which are shorter than the back legs. It also has four toes on each foot. The toes are a pinky colour and each toe has a strong short claw.

The Hazel Dormouse has large black beady eyes and round ears. It has very long black whiskers. The whiskers can be up to thirty centimetres long. The whiskers quiver and shake even when the Hazel Dormouse is keeping really still.

Hedgehog

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Hedgehogs are very popular in England. Sometimes they can be seen in parks and gardens. They can be very loud when they shuffle through leaves.

The Hedgehog is a small spiny animal. The upper part of its body is covered in short, yellow-tipped spines. The Hedgehog has about five thousand spines on its body. The sharp spines help to protect the Hedgehog. A Hedgehog rolls into a ball when it feels in danger.

The Hedgehog has brown fur on its face, tail, legs and belly. It has small ears and a long pointed face and a black nose. The Hedgehog sometimes pokes its nose into clumps of grass to find food.

The Hedgehog has small dark eyes and it has poor eyesight. The Hedgehog can’t see many colours, but it can recognise the colour yellow. The Hedgehog has a good sense of smell and hearing. It can hear and smell a worm three centimetres below the ground!

The Hedgehog has four long legs and it can run as fast as a human can walk. The Hedgehog has padded feet with five toes. The toes have strong claws. The Hedgehog uses its claws to clean and groom itself and also to dig insects out of the ground.

Heron grey

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

The Grey Heron is a tall bird with long brown legs. It almost looks lanky. The Grey Heron is the tallest bird in England and can be seen all year round. It sometimes visits gardens to steal fish out of garden ponds!

The Grey Heron can be recognised by its long neck. Sometimes the neck looks like a long ‘S’ shape. The Grey Heron can also be recognised by its long pointed beak. The beak is a yellow colour and looks like a sharp dagger. Sometimes the beak changes into a deep orange colour.

The Grey Heron is about one hundred centimetres tall. It has a large body even though the head and the neck are longer than the body. The top and the sides of the body are a grey colour. The long neck is also a grey colour at the top and the sides. The underside of the neck is a white colour.

The Grey Heron has a long white head and a white belly. It has a black crest of long black feathers. The crest is a bunch of feathers on top of the head. The Grey Heron also has black feathers running down its white throat. It also has black feathers above each eye.

The Grey Heron has long yellow-orange legs. It can often be seen standing very still near water waiting to catch fish.

Sponsored by:

Jackdaw

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Jackdaws can often be seen in towns and cities near churches and old buildings. They sometimes visit gardens when they need more food for their young.

The Jackdaw can easily be recognised because it has silvery white coloured eyes. It also has very dark grey feathers all over its body. From a distance the feathers look jet-black. In strong light the feathers on the back seem to have a slight purple sheen to them.

The Jackdaw can also be recognised by the silver-grey feathers on the back of its head and sides of its neck. These feathers make the Jackdaw look like it is wearing a silver-grey hood.

Jackdaws are quite small stocky-looking birds. They are about thirty-four centimetres long and they weigh around two hundred and fifty grammes. Jackdaws have short stubby black beaks and long thin black legs.

The Jackdaw has four toes on each foot. Three toes point forward and one toe points backwards. Each toe has a curved claw. When the Jackdaw is on the ground, it looks buoyant and confident. It has a light rapid walk and it even looks light on the step when it hops and runs.

Jay

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Jays are shy and secretive birds even though they can scream very loud. Jays are also known as ‘screamers of the woods’. Jays like to hide in trees that are quite dense so they can’t be seen. Jays are easier to spot when the leaves have fallen off the trees.

The Jay has bright electric-blue and white wings. The wings also are lined with black feathers. The colours of the wings look quite impressive. The colours can be seen quite clearly when the Jay flutters from tree to tree.

The Jay is a medium-sized bird. It is about thirty-five centimetres in length. It has pinkish fawn coloured feathers on its body. The Jay also has a pinkish fawn coloured face and a broad black beak. The Jay looks like it has a thick black moustache on either side of its beak. It also has pale eyes that look very alert.

The Jay has a round head and a black and white crest. The crest is a bunch of feathers on the top of the head. The Jay sometimes raises its crest. Its head looks square-shaped when the Jay raises its crest.

Kestrel

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Kestrels can often be seen soaring near motorways, stretches of roads and busy dual carriageways. They are easy birds to spot if you are in a car!

The Kestrel is a ‘bird of prey’ and a ‘raptor’. A bird of prey is a bird that hunts smaller birds as well as other animals. A raptor is a bird of prey that hunts for food mainly by using its talons. The word ‘raptor’ in Latin means ‘to seize and to carry away’.

The Kestrel can also be recognised by its reddish brown back with black markings. The male Kestrel has a grey head and a grey tail. The female has a reddish brown head with black markings and a reddish brown tail. The tail has black stripes running across it.

The Kestrel can also be easily recognised when it soars the sky. Its wings look long and broad even though they narrow slightly at the end. The Kestrel is a relatively small bird of prey. It is about thirty-five centimetres in length and has a wingspan of around eighty centimetres.

Both the female and the male Kestrel have very short necks. They also have short and powerful hooked beaks. The beak is a bluish colour and it has a notch that acts like a ‘tooth’. The Kestrel uses the ‘tooth’ to snap the neck of prey.

Lizard sand

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Sand Lizards are extremely rare in England. They are also very shy and secretive. They like to spend a lot of time hiding in vegetation or under sand. This is why they are called Sand Lizards.

The Sand Lizard has a short stocky body and a long tail. The tail narrows to a thin point and it is about twelve centimetres long. The tail is actually longer that the body of the Sand Lizard. Sand Lizards have scales all over their bodies. The scales are larger on the head and the neck.

A male Sand Lizard can easily be recognised because the sides of its body are a bright green colour. The male is also slightly bigger than the female and it has a broader head.

Both the male and the female Sand Lizard have a dark stripe running down the middle of their backs. The stripe has patches of darker markings and within each patch there is a white coloured dot.

The base colour of the male Sand Lizard is normally brown and the base colour of the female is either a pale grey or light brown. The underside of both the male and the female Sand Lizard is a whitish grey colour with lots of dark spots.

Sand Lizards can smell with their tongues and they can lose their tails if they get really scared!

Mole

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Moles are very busy little animals because they are always digging and looking for food to eat. They spend most of the time on their own in dark tunnels under the ground. They are busy at night and also during the day.

The Mole is small and it has a rounded body. It has grey-black velvety fur. Some people call it the ‘little gentleman in black velvet’. The Mole doesn’t have a neck. Its head is joined directly to its body. It also has two very large hands.

The ears of the Mole are small. They are also hidden in the fur so that earth doesn’t go into them when the Mole is digging a tunnel. The Mole also has a short furry tail which is always held upright.

Moles have really tiny eyes. They are the size of pinheads and they are usually closed. Moles can’t recognise colour, but they can see things move and they can tell whether it is light or dark.

The Mole has a long pointed nose. The front part of the nose is called a ‘snout’. The snout is pink and it is very sensitive. The Mole also has forty-four very sharp teeth which it uses if it has to fight with other Moles.

Nuthatche

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Nuthatches can often be seen in woods. They are easy to notice because they can walk up and down tree trunks. Nuthatches can climb down trees head first.

A Nuthatch is a small and quite plump bird. It can be recognised because the top part of its body is a blue-grey colour and the sides of the body are an orange- brown colour. The Nuthatch is about fifteen centimetres in size, although male Nuthatches are slightly bigger than female Nuthatches.

The Nuthatch has a white chin and an orange-brown coloured chest. It has a blue-grey head and two black eyes. The Nuthatch has a sharp black pointed bill. It also has a long black stripe that runs from the top of the bill to the back of the neck. The stripe looks like it runs through the eye.

The tail of the Nuthatch is short and square-shaped and it is a blue-grey colour. The legs and feet are yellowish brown. The legs are short, but the feet are large. The feet have three toes that face forward and one toe that faces backwards. Each toe has a strong powerful claw. The Nuthatch uses its claws to climb up and down trees.

Otter

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Otters are very shy and secretive animals. They spend a lot of time in rivers and streams at night looking for fish to eat. They are very rarely seen.

The Otter can be recognised by its big black nose. The nose is the shape of a hexagon. It can also be recognised by its long powerful tail. The Otter also has a long slender body. The top part of the body is covered in a greyish brown fur. The underside of the body is a pale cream colour.

The Otter has a broad head and a short neck. It also has a broad long face with whiskers on each side. Its mouth is set under its long face just like the mouth of a shark. The eyes of the Otter are placed high up on the head so that the Otter can see when the rest of its body is below water.

The Otter’s back legs are longer than its front legs. The feet of the Otter are webbed with claws. The Otter uses its claws to grip fish. Otters also have small ears with flaps. The flaps close when Otters are in the water. Otters keep their eyes open when they swim. They can see better under water than above.

Otters have very large lungs. They take one deep breath and then dive under water. They can stay under water for more than four minutes.

Peacock Butterflies

LEVEL2 – Ages 6/7

Peacock Butterflies are one of the first butterflies to be seen in spring. They can be seen in parks and gardens where there are lots of flowers.

The Peacock Butterfly is easily recognisable because it has a large ‘eye spot’ on each of its four wings. Each eye spot is situated on the outer edge of each wing and all have bright blue markings inside. The eye spots have other colours inside them such as black, cream, orange and white.

The eye spots look similar to the eye spots that can be seen on the tail of a Peacock. This is why this butterfly is called the ‘Peacock Butterfly’.

The main colour of the wings of the Peacock Butterfly is a brownish red colour with black markings. The tips of the wings are bordered with a light brown colour.

The Peacock Butterfly rests with its wings closed together in an upright position over its body. This position reveals the underside of the wings which is a dark brown colour. The dark underside acts as a good camouflage for the Peacock Butterfly when it rests or sleeps in dark places.

The forewings of the Peacock Butterfly are bigger than the hindwings. The hindwings look like the head of an owl if you look at them from an upside position!

Raven

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Ravens can be seen all year round near wooded areas that have large open land nearby. Sometimes they can be seen in cities. Many Ravens can be seen flying around the Tower of London.

The Raven can easily be recognised because it has black feathers all over its body. In strong light the feathers seem to have a purplish or reddish sheen to them. The Raven can also be recognised because it has shaggy feathers on its throat. The throat feathers are called ‘hackles’. They look a bit similar to a mane.

The Raven also has neat feathers on the top part of its legs. These feathers are called ‘thigh feathers’. The thigh feathers make the Raven look like it is wearing short baggy trousers! The Raven has a very large and powerful black beak that is slightly curved at the end. There are neat feathers around the base of the beak.

Ravens are large-looking birds. They can be up to sixty to seventy centimetres long and they weigh between seven hundred grammes to one thousand six hundred grammes. Ravens also have a wingspan of a hundred and fifty centimetres.

When a Raven flies, the wings at the front first slope forward and then bend sharply backwards. The wings also look like they have long extended fingers. The tail looks long and wedge-shaped when the Raven is in flight.

Robin

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Robins frequently visit gardens and they can be heard singing day and night. They can often be seen singing next to street lights at night!

Robins are small plump birds. They are about fourteen centimetres long. Despite their size Robins often chase larger birds away from bird tables. Robins can be quite determined when they want to be!

The Robin is also known as the ‘Red Robin’ because of its bright orange-red chest, neck and face. The top of the head and the upper parts of the body are an olive-brown colour. The red and olive-brown is separated by a thin band of grey-blue which runs just above the eyes.

The under part of the Robin is white and the wings and tail are olive-brown. The Robin has long thin legs and feet which are a pale brown colour. It has four toes on each foot. Three toes point forward and one toe points backwards. Each toe has a sharp curved claw.

The Robin has black eyes that are prominent. Its beak is short and thin. Male and female Robins look almost identical and sometimes even Robins themselves have problems to tell each other apart!

Rook

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

The Rook is a medium-sized black bird and it can be seen all year round around the verges of busy roads looking for food. Rooks can also be seen near open fields too.

The Rook can easily be recognised because it has black feathers all over its body. In strong light the feathers seem to have a purplish or reddish sheen to them. The Rook can also be recognised because its beak is a greyish white colour at the base. The rest of the beak is black. Young Rooks only have a black beak. The beak of the Rook is relatively slender and pointed.

The Rook also has untidy feathers on the top part of its legs. These feathers are called ‘thigh feathers’. The thigh feathers make the Rook look like it is wearing short baggy trousers!

Rooks are quite stocky-looking birds. They are about forty-five centimetres in length and they weigh around five hundred grammes. The Rook has a flat forehead which makes the top of its head look a little bit pointed. The Rook raises the feathers on the top of its head when it is excited.

Snake grass

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

The Grass Snake is the largest snake in England. The average length of a Grass Snake is about one hundred and twenty centimetres. Females are usually longer than males and they can sometimes be up to two hundred centimetres long!

Grass Snakes can be recognised by a yellow band behind the head. The band looks like a yellow collar. When the Grass Snake swims in water, the yellow collar can be seen quite clearly. Sometimes the collar can be cream or white.

The Grass Snake has a slender body, but it is thicker in the middle. The body is usually a grey-green colour. It can be brown sometimes. The Grass Snake has black vertical stripes on the sides of its body and it also has small black markings on its back. The body is covered in lots of scales. The underside is patterned with alternating black and white scales. The colour and markings allow the Grass Snake to be well-camouflaged outside.

The Grass Snake has a round-shaped head. Its eyes are a golden colour and they have round black pupils. The Grass Snake has a black line which runs underneath each eye to the top of the mouth. The tongue of the Grass Snake is a blue-black colour.

Snake smooth

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

The Smooth Snake is a relatively small snake. It has a slender body that is covered with lots of smooth scales. The body feels very smooth if you touch it.

The Smooth Snake can be recognised by a large black patch on the top of its oval-shaped head. The patch is almost heart-shaped. The Smooth Snake has a black stripe on each side of its face. The stripe seems to run through the eye right down to the neck.

A male Smooth Snake has a body that is a reddish brown colour and the female has a body that is a greyish green colour. The body narrows gradually along its length with the tail almost becoming pointed.

The average length of a Smooth Snake is about fifty to sixty centimetres, although some can grow up to eighty-five centimetres. The female is slightly longer than the male and has a shorter tail.

Both the female and the male Smooth Snake have two long dark grey stripes running down their bodies. The stripes are formed by spot-like markings. The markings look like they are joined together.

Smooth Snakes have gold coloured eyes and round black pupils. They also have reddish brown coloured tongues.

Squirrel red

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Red Squirrels can be seen climbing up and down trees in parks and gardens. They can even hang upside down from trees.

The Red Squirrel has bright chestnut coloured fur in summer. In winter the fur is a dark brown. The Red Squirrel has a long bushy tail that is a chestnut colour too. In late summer the tail turns to a white-cream colour. The underside of the Red Squirrel is always a white-cream colour.

The Red Squirrel has small ears with long tufts of hair. The ear tufts help to keep the ears warm. The Red Squirrel has a pointed nose and a good sense of smell. It can smell food thirty centimetres under snow.

The Red Squirrel has black eyes. The fur around the eyes is a white colour. The Red Squirrel has good eyesight. It can quite easily measure the distance from tree to tree. If the distance is too far to jump, the Red Squirrel climbs down the tree and walks or runs to the next tree.

The Red Squirrel has short front legs and long back legs. Each of its front feet has four long toes with curved claws and a very small thumb. The back feet also have four long toes with claws, but no thumbs. The Red Squirrel uses its front feet and claws like hands to eat food. It uses its back feet and claws to cling onto trees.

Stoat

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Stoats are very active and curious animals. They are always exploring holes and cracks to see if they can find food. They hunt during the day and at night.

The Stoat has a long slender body which is a reddish brown colour at the top. The underpart of the body is a cream-white colour. The Stoat has a medium-sized bushy tail. The tail is a reddish-brown colour and has a black tip. Some Stoats turn white in winter, but the tip of the tail always stays black. The white fur can be a very good camouflage when there is snow on the ground.

The Stoat has a long neck and a pointed face. It has long whiskers at either side of its face. It also has round, sticky-out eyes and large round ears.

Stoats have short legs and the front feet are smaller than the back feet. The front feet can fit into small tight spaces. Each foot of the Stoat has five toes with long sharp claws. The claws help the Stoat to climb up trees. Sometimes Stoats climb high up trees to steal eggs out of nests or to eat baby birds!

Thrush mistle

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

The Mistle Thrush can often be seen in open woodlands. It can sometimes be seen in gardens when food is scarce. It can also be heard singing songs.

The Mistle Thrush sings its songs very quietly at the beginning and then quite loud towards the end. It likes singing lots of different songs with pauses between each song.

The Mistle Thrush can be recognised because it has a creamy white coloured breast, tummy and sides with lots of dark brown spots. The spots seem to be randomly scattered all over.

The upper part of the Mistle Thrush is a grey-brown colour and the feathers on the back have a slight yellow border. The tail is relatively long and is a grey-brown colour too. The outer tail feathers have a white tip on each.

The Mistle Thrushe is quite a stocky-looking bird with a fat belly It is about twenty-seven centimetres long and weighs about one hundred and thirty grammes. It has a pale grey-brown face with dark markings and a blackish brown beak.

Mistle Thrushes spend a lot of time on the ground looking for food. It runs or hops for a short distance on the ground. When a Mistle Thrush stops for a moment, it looks very proud and bold because it stands very straight and erect.

Thrush Song

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

The Song Thrush can be seen in gardens, parks and woods all year round. It can also be heard singing very loud songs. It likes to sing the same song about three times and then it sings another song about three times!

The Song Thrush can easily be recognised because it has creamy white coloured breast, tummy and sides with lots of dark brown spots. The spots look like they are in neat little rows. The upper part of the Song Thrush is a medium-brown colour. The tail is relatively short and it is also medium-brown.

Song Thrushes are quite stocky-looking birds. They are about twenty-three centimetres long and they weigh around seventy to ninety grammes. The Song Thrush has a brown face and a relatively short brown beak.

The Song Thrush spends a lot of time on the ground looking for food. It runs or hops and then suddenly stops when it is on the ground. When it stops, it leans its head to one side as though it is listening out for something. After a short while it runs or hops for a short distance again and then stops and listens out again. It always seems to be on alert.

Vole water

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Water Voles can be seen near streams and canals. Water voles prefer slow-flowing water because they are not very strong swimmers. They always keep their noses above water and swim ‘doggy paddle’ style. They make ‘plop’ sounds when they jump into water.

The Water Vole is small animal with a round plump body. The body is covered with a silky chestnut-brown fur. The Water Vole has a long thin brown tail which is covered with lots of tiny hairs.

The face of the Water Vole is short and fat with two small bulging eyes. Its nose is not very pointed. It has short furry ears that are almost hidden in the fur. The ears have flaps of skin inside. These flaps of skin stop water getting into the ears when the Water Vole swims.

The Water Vole has five toes on its back feet and four toes on its front feet. The first and fifth toes on the back feet are spread apart. Water Voles leave star-shaped foot prints behind them when they walk on muddy ground.

The Water Vole uses the four little toes on its front feet to hold onto food. When the Water Vole eats, it sits hunched over and gnaws at the food with its sharp front teeth. The front teeth are a bright orange colour!

Water Scorpion

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Water Scorpions are insects that like to live in ponds and lakes. Even though Water Scorpions live in water they don’t like to swim. They like to keep as still as possible.

A Water Scorpion can often be mistaken for a dead leaf because it keeps so still. It has a very flat body which is a blackish brown colour. The length of the body is about twenty-five millimetres. The width of the body is between six to ten millimetres.

The Water Scorpion has quite a long tail. It is about ten millimetres in length. It uses its tail to be able to breathe. The head of the Water Scorpion is very small and triangular-shaped. The Water Scorpion has two large round-shaped eyes. The eyes are a black colour.

Water Scorpions have three pairs of legs. The first pair of legs is situated right at the front of the head. The front legs are very powerful. Water Scorpions use the front legs to catch food.

The second pair of legs is at the front part of the body and the third pair of legs is in the middle of the body. The second pair of legs is smaller than the third pair of legs. The Water Scorpion uses these legs to crawl on the ground in very shallow water.

Weasel

LEVEL2 – Ages 6/7

Weasels are small animals that are not very often seen. They like to hunt under cover in tunnels. They are active by day and by night.

The Weasel has a long slender body. The top of the body is a chestnut-brown colour. The underside of the body is a white colour. The Weasel has a long pointed face with beady eyes that stick out. It has small round-shaped ears.

The head is the widest part of the Weasel. If its head can squeeze through a hole of a tunnel, the rest of the body will follow. A Weasel can squeeze its head through a little mouse hole!

The Weasel has short legs. Even though the legs are short the Weasel can still run as fast as ten kilometres per hour. It is so fast that it is just recognised as a long thin brown coloured streak when it dashes across the road.

The Weasel has five toes on each foot. Each toe has a sharp claw. The claws help the Weasel to climb up trees. Sometimes Weasels climb up trees to steal eggs out of nests or to eat baby birds! Weasels are also really good swimmers and they often chase Water Voles in the water.

White-clawed Crayfish

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

The White-clawed Crayfish is not a fish like its name suggests. It is a bit like a lobster. The White-clawed Crayfish lives in freshwater rivers and streams. It likes to hide under stones and rocks under water.

The White-clawed Crayfish looks like it has two long arms sticking out at the front of its body. The arms have large pincers at the end. Pincers are claws which the White-clawed Crayfish uses to grab hold of its prey.

The White-clawed Crayfish also has two pairs of antennae sticking out of the front of its head. One pair of antennae is nearly as long as its arms and pincers. The other pair of antennae is quite short. The White-clawed Crayfish can find and taste food with its antennae.

The body of the White-clawed Crayfish is covered in a brown or olive-brown coloured shell. The length of the body is about ten centimetres. The White-clawed Crayfish has four pairs of walking legs attached to its body. The claws are also classed as legs because the White-clawed Crayfish uses its claws when it wants to walk. The underside of the claws is usually an off-white colour. This is why this crayfish is called the White-clawed Crayfish.

Wren

LEVEL 2 – Ages 6/7

Wrens are frequent visitors to gardens and they always seem to be on the move. They are very energetic birds.

Wrens are tiny birds. They are the second smallest bird in England, after the Goldcrest. The length of the Wren is about ten centimetres. The Wren can easily be recognised because it has a small tail that is always cocked up in the air. The tail is a reddish brown colour with dark brown stripes running across it.

The Wren has a plump round body and a short neck. Sometimes a Wren could be mistaken for a small brown ball. The top part of the body is a deep reddish brown colour. The underpart of the body is a light brown colour with dark brown streaky stripes. The chest and chin of the Wren are a yellowy brown colour.

The Wren has dark brown eyes. It has a long cream-coloured stripe above each eye. The Wren looks like it has cream-coloured eyebrows. The Wren also has a long thin beak which slightly curves downwards at the tip. The top part of the beak is nearly black and the bottom part is a pale yellow colour.

The Wren has two long strong legs and two large feet. On each foot there are four toes. Wrens stand on their toes and not on the flats of their feet like humans do.